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Everything You Need To Know About the Baja 1000 Offroad Race

Updated: Oct 11, 2023


Everything You Need To Know About the Baja 1000 Offroad Race

San Juanico

Everything You Need To Know About the Baja 1000 Offroad Race


The Baja 1000 is one of the most taxing and challenging offroad races in the world. Spanning over 1000 miles of treacherous terrain in the Baja California peninsula, the race attracts thousands of spectators and offroad enthusiasts each year. It is truly a special time in Baja and is something we hope everyone has a chance to experience. In this blog post, we'll dive into everything you need to know about this iconic race.


What is the Baja 1000

The Baja 1000 takes place annually in the Baja California Peninsula in Mexico. The race covers over 1000 miles of terrain, including dirt roads, rocky terrain, sand dunes, and even pavement in some sections. This year, the course starts in La Paz and finishes in the city of Ensenada. It passes through small towns, rocky canyons, and narrow mountain trails. We are very excited because we get to be in the thick of the race, as it will pass directly through our home, San Juanico. If you're looking to witness something special, the Scorpion Bay Hotel will be a prime location to stay during the race this year. The race features multiple vehicle classes, including Trophy Trucks, Class 1 buggies, motorcycles, and UTVs, each with their own set of rules and regulations. It is considered the highest of all off-road motorsports accomplishments for these competitors. The Baja 1000 has quite a rich history dating back to 1967 when American desert racing pioneer, Ed Pearlman, and his friend Don Francisco staged the first race. Today, the Baja 1000 is part of the SCORE International Off-Road Racing Series and is widely recognized as one of the most challenging and exciting off-road races in the world. We look forward to seeing what goes down in the 2023 Baja 1000, yeewww!


History

The first Baja 1000 race was held in 1967 and was the brainchild of American desert racing pioneer, Ed Pearlman, and his friend Don Francisco. The idea was simple: to create a challenging off-road race that would test the limits of man and machine. The inaugural race had only a handful of competitors, but it quickly grew in popularity, attracting more racers and fans over the years. In the early years of the Baja 1000, the race was a true test of endurance and survival. Racers had to navigate through the wild terrain, often with little more than a map and a compass to guide them. The course was constantly changing, with new obstacles and challenges added each year. As the Baja 1000 gained popularity, it began to attract more high-profile racers and sponsors. In the 1980s, the race was dominated by the likes of Ivan Stewart, Robby Gordon, and Walker Evans, who helped to bring the sport of off-road racing to the mainstream. Today, the race has become a major tourism event for the Baja California Peninsula, attracting thousands of spectators and generating a lot of revenue for local businesses.

History of  Baja 1000 Offroad Race

Photo Courtesy of Baja Bound

Baja 1000 Winners

The Baja 1000 has had numerous winners throughout its long and storied history. Some of the most successful racers in the history of the Baja 1000 include Ivan Stewart, who has won the race multiple times in both trucks and buggies, and Johnny Campbell, who has won the motorcycle class of the race numerous times. Other notable winners include Robby Gordon, Larry Roeseler, and Rod Hall, who were all pioneers of the sport of off-road racing. In recent years, the race has been dominated by a new generation of racers, including B.J. Baldwin, who has won the race multiple times in the Trophy Truck class, and Cameron Steele, who won the race in 2018 in the Trophy Truck class. We have been lucky to host some of these off-road legends at the Scorpion Bay Hotel over the years, and look forward to seeing more of them in 2023. Below is a list of all the winners dating back to 1967:

  • 2022 Mark Samuels / Justin Morgan / Kendall Norman (Honda) Time: 18:51:30

  • 2021 Mark Samuels / Justin Morgan / Kendall Norman / Brandon Prieto (Honda) Time: 23:07:18

  • 2020 Mark Samuels / Justin Morgan / Justin Jones (Honda) Time: 20:50:30

  • 2019 Justin Morgan / David Kamo / Max Eddy Jr./ Shane Esposito (Honda) Time: 17:34:28

  • 2018 Justin Morgan / Mark Samuels / Justin Jones (Honda) Time: 16:23:26

  • 2017 Francisco Arredondo / Shane Esposito / Justin Morgan / Max Eddy Jr. / Ty Davis (Honda) Time: 21:07:16

  • 2016 Colton Udall / Mark Samuels / Justin Jones / David Kamo / Daymon Stokie (Honda) Time: 18:16:42

  • 2015 Colton Udall / Mark Samuels / Justin Jones (Honda) Time: 16:29:08

  • 2014 Ricky Brabec / Robby Bell / Steve Hengeveld / Max Eddy Jr. (Kawasaki) Time: 24:24:01

  • 2013 Colton Udall / David Kamo / Mark Samuels / Timmy Weigand (Honda) Time: 18:29:14

  • 2012 Colton Udall / David Kamo / Timmy Weigand (Honda) Time: 20:09:30

  • 2011 Kendall Norman / Quinn Cody /Logan Holladay (Honda) Time: 14:14:25

  • 2010 Quinn Cody / Kendall Norman (Honda) Time: 19:20:52

  • 2009 Quinn Cody / Kendall Norman / Timmy Weigand (Honda) Time: 13:27:50

  • 2008 Robby Bell / Kendall Norman / Johnny Campbell (Honda) Time: 12:29:10

  • 2007 Robby Bell / Steve Hengeveld / Johnny Campbell / Kendall Norman (Honda) Time: 24:15:50

  • 2006 Steve Hengeveld / Mike Childress / Quinn Cody (Honda) Time: 18:17:50

  • 2005 Johnny Campbell / Mike Childress / Steve Hengeveld (Honda) Time: 14:20:30

  • 2004 Johnny Campbell / Steve Hengeveld (Honda) Time: 15:57:37

  • 2003 Johnny Campbell / Steve Hengeveld (Honda) Time: 15:39:52

  • 2002 Johnny Campbell / Steve Hengeveld / Andy Grider (Honda) Time: 16:17:28

  • 2001 Johnny Campbell / Tim Staab (Honda) Time: 13:51:40

  • 2000 Johnny Campbell / S. Hengeveld / C. Smith / T. Staab (Honda) Time: 30:54:12

  • 1999 Johnny Campbell / Tim Staab (Honda) Time: 14:15:42

  • 1998 Johnny Campbell / Jimmy Lewis (Honda) Time: 18:58:48

  • 1997 Greg Brindle / Johnny Campbell / Tim Staab (Honda) Time: 13:19:59

  • 1996 Ty Davis / Paul Krause / Greg Zitterkopf (Kawasaki) Time: 14:11:02

  • 1995 Ty Davis / Ted Hunnicutt Jr. / Paul Krause (Kawasaki) Time: 19:31:19

  • 1994 Ty Davis / Danny Hamel / Larry Roeseler (Kawasaki) Time: 10:20:47

  • 1993 Ty Davis / Danny Hamel / Larry Roeseler (Kawasaki) Time: 13:57:23

  • 1992 Danny Hamel / Paul Ostbo / Garth Sweetland (Kawasaki) Time: 16:50:12

  • 1991 Ted Hunnicutt Jr. / Larry Roeseler / Marty SMITH (Kawasaki) Time: 13:35:25

  • 1990 Ted Hunnicutt Jr. / Danny Laporte / Larry Roeseler (Kawasaki) Time: 11:11:45

  • 1989 Ted Hunnicutt Jr. / Danny Laporte / Larry Roeseler (Kawasaki) Time: 17:53:16

  • 1988 Paul Krause / Danny Laporte / Larry Roeseler (Kawasaki) Time: 17:53:16

  • 1987 Dan Ashcroft / Bruce Ogilvie (Honda) Time: 12:02:14

  • 1986 Chuck Miller / Bruce Ogilvie (Honda) Time: 18:05:52

  • 1985 Randy Morales / Derrick Paiement (Honda) Time: 17:44:42

  • 1984 Chuck Miller / Randy Morales (Honda) Time: 14:34:34

  • 1983 Dan Ashcroft / Dan Smith (Husqvarna) Time: 14:48:10

  • 1982 Al Baker / Jack Johnson (Honda) Time: 17:25:27

  • 1981 Scot Harden / Brent Wallingsford (Husqvarna) Time: 17:14:05

  • 1980 Jack Johnson / Larry Roeseler (Yamaha) Time: 12:45:13

  • 1979 Jack Johnson / Larry Roeseler (Husqvarna) Time: 19:48:04

  • 1978 Jack Johnson / Larry Roeseler (Husqvarna) Time: 14:37:07

  • 1977 Scot Harden / Brent Wallingsford (Husqvarna) Time: 14:37:07

  • 1976 Mitch Mayes / Larry Roeseler (Husqvarna) Time: 11:30:47

  • 1975 Al Baker / Gene Cannady (Honda) Time: 18:22:55

  • 1974 (No Race)

  • 1973 A.C. Bakken / Mitch Mayes (Husqvarna) Time: 18:42:51

  • 1972 Gunnar Nilsson / Rolf Tibblin (Husqvarna) Time: 19:19

  • 1971 Gunnar Nilsson / Malcolm Smith (Husqvarna) Time: 16:51

  • 1970 Bill Bowers / Mike Patrick (Yamaha) Time: 18:31

  • 1969 Gunnar Nilsson / J.N. Roberts (Husqvarna) Time: 21:35:52

  • 1968 Larry Berquist / Gary Preston (Honda) Time: 20:38:28

  • 1967 J.N. Roberts / Malcolm Smith (Husqvarna) Time: 28:48

List of winners from riderplanet-usa.com

Baja 1000 Offroad Race

Cameron Steele Staying at the Scorpion Bay Hotel

Cameron Steele

Kendal Norman during the 2021 Baja 1000


How Long Is The Baja 1000

The course is around 1000 miles long and is constantly changing, with new obstacles and challenges added each year, making it a true test of endurance. The race is run non-stop, with competitors racing day and night until they reach the finish line. Along the course, there are numerous stops and checkpoints where racers must stop to refuel, make repairs, and check in with race officials. There are also several speed zones along the course where racers must slow down to ensure the safety of themselves, other racers, and spectators. These speed zones are strictly enforced, and penalties can be assessed for any violations. Overall, the length of the Baja 1000 creates a true test of skill, endurance, and determination, and it's no wonder that it has become one of the most prestigious off-road races in the world.

Baja 1000 Route

The exact route of the Baja 1000 varies from year to year, but it typically covers over 1000 miles and takes place in the rugged terrain of Baja California. The route typically starts and finishes in the town of Ensenada, located on the west coast of the Baja California Peninsula. With that said, 2023 will be different and have the race start in the city of La Paz. This is very special in a lot of different ways and is going to be an exciting year for the Baja 1000. From there, the course winds its way through the rugged mountains and deserts of the peninsula, with racers facing steep climbs, treacherous descents, and challenging river crossings. Along the way, the course passes through numerous small towns and villages, where locals come out to cheer on the racers and offer support in the form of food, water, and even repairs if needed. See the map below for a detailed look at the 2023 Baja 1000!



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